Thursday, August 11, 2011

John Quincy Adams

J. Q. Adams was the first President to be photographed. This picture was taken shortly before his death.

John Quincy Adams 6th President of the United States (1825- 1829)

J. Q. Adams sites that I have seen: Adams birthplace home, Quincy, MA
                                                  
 Adams 'Peacefield' home, Quincy, MA
                                                    
U. S. Capital Building, site of Adams death Washington DC
                                                    
Adams gravesite at United First Parish Church Quincy, MA.




J. Q. Adams birthplace in Quincy, MA

When you go to Quincy, MA to see John Adams sites you get 2 Presidents for one. When you visit the saltbox house where John Adams was born, right next to it is another saltbox house where his son, John Quincy Adams was born. When you visit John Adams 'Peacefield' home, you are also visiting John Quincy Adams Peacefield home, since John Quincy Adams inherited the home after his fathers death. Finally when you visit John Adams gravesite at United First Parish church, no surprise, John Quincy Adams is also there.




Backside of Adams Peacefield home. Taken in September 2009.


Picture I took of Adams home Peacefield in September 2013.


I also snapped this pic in September 2013. This is the Adams Library, in a way its the first Presidential Library. It holds the personal collection of books and papers owned by John Adams, John Quincy Adams and Charles Francis Adams (JQ Adams son)


No pictures are allowed inside of Peacefield or the Library. But this picture of the inside of the Library is on one of the walls of the visitors center.


U. S. Capital Building. Site of J. Q. Adams death. Washington DC. At age 80, Adams was serving in the House of Represenatives. It was here that he suddenly died in 1848


In the old House Chamber. Marker on floor makes mention that this is the site where John Quincy Adams sat when he served as a Congressman in his later years. Adams was often seen with his head on his desk. His colleagues thought that he was sleeping. But because of the acoustics in the room, he was really listening to what they were saying about him from the other side of the room. A cool trick that our tour guide did was had us stay at that spot as he walked across the room and started talking. We could hear him just the way that Adams could hear his fellow Congressmen. 






On the other side of this door is the room in which John Quincy Adams died. They would let me go in because I'm not a female member of Congress. They did mention that the couch on which he died is still in that room

Of course I didn't take his picture but somebody did send it to me. This is the couch on which John Quincy Adams died. 


This is a statue of Abigail Adams and a young John Quincy Adams watching the battle of Bunker Hill from afar. It is just outside of the church in which the Adams are buried.


This is the old Adams family vault. It is in Hancock Cemetery, across the street from the United First Parish Church where the Adams are buried. Both John and John Quincy Adams where buried here while their perminate resting place was being prepared across the street. John Quincy Adams sister Abilgail "Nabby" Adams Smith is still buried here.



United First Parish Church where the Adams are buried

Sitting in John Quincy Adams pew at the church. The church was being built around the time that John Adams died. So he never actually attended here. John Quincy arranged for his parents crypt to be constructed in the basement. After the church was completed John Quincy was a regular member and this was his seat. When John Quincy died, his son Charles Francis Adams arranged for space to be made in the crypt for his parents.

Memorial to John Quincy and Louisa Catherine Adams in the santuary.



Graves of John Quincy Adams and his wife Louisa Catherine Adams






My first trip to John Quincy Adams grave in September 2009.


My return trip to John Quincy Adams grave in September 2013

John Quincy Adams was the first son the a President who would become President. The only other one of course was George W. Bush. Adams served one mostly unhappy term as President, loosing to Andrew Jackson in 1828 in his re election bid. Adams later became the only former President to serve in the House of Represenatives. He did so for 17 years until his death at the age of 80.

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