Thursday, August 11, 2011

Andrew Jackson



Andrew Jackson 7th President of the United States (1829-1837)

Jackson sites that I have visited:

Andrew Jackson's birthplace sites in Lancaster, SC and Waxhaw, NC

Jackson's 'Hermitage' Home and gravesite Hermitage, TN



Andrew Jackson is the only President who's birthplace is claimed by 2 different states. It started when Andrew Jackson's  father Andrew Jackson Sr. died a few months before the future President was born. Jackson had 2 Uncles who's families helped out his young widowed mother to various degrees. His Uncle James Crawford lived in South Carolina. His Uncle George McKemey lived just 3 miles away across the state line in North Carolina. Both States claim Jackson was born at whichever Uncles property is on their land. Jackson himself says that he was born at his Uncle James Crawfords house on the South Carolina. 

So naturally both States have memorials at the sites of each Uncles properties. South Carolina does it bigger with Andrew Jackson State Park. They have a small museum to Jackson, a boyhood statue of him on a horse, and a stone historical marker. 



















Above is the stone historical marker in Andrew Jackson State Park on the South Carolina site. 


Here is the stone marker on the North Carolina side. Just 3 miles away from the State Park



        Me at the North Carolina marker

Jackson's parents and brothers are all buried at an old church cemetery about 12 miles from the State Park. Above is the gravesite of his father. 

This is the gravesite of Jackson's mother and 2 older brothers. One brother on each side of the statue of their mother. All 3 died during the Revolution, leaving Andrew the last surviving member of his family as a teenager. 


Me in front of The Hermitage. March 2012





Backside of the Hermitage
 
Unfortunately no pictures are allowed inside the main Hermitage house

Uncle Alfred's cabin. Alfred Jackson was a slave at the Hermitage. Because of how close he was with the Jackson family he remained at the Hermitage after the Emancipation. He is buried in the garden near Andrew and Rachel Jackson.

President Jackson lived on a very scenic property



This open yard at the Hermitage ones contained the Slave quarters

 
Me at part of the original Hermitage house. Andrew and Rachel Jackson lived here for 17 years until the larger main house was built.

These 2 buildings where once on top of each other and consisted of the original Hermitage House before the main house was finished.

Taking in the History at the Hermitage


Fireplace in one of the Old Hermitage buildings


Part of Rachel Jackson's rose garden where the Jackson's are buried 



Klo and I at the grave of Andrew Jackson at the Hermitage. June 2009


Me at Jackson's gravesite in March 2012

I have visited Andrew Jackson's Hermitage home twice. The first time was in June 2009 on my way down to Texas. It was a very hot day and we had our 5 month old daughter Khloe with us. We toured the house and saw the Jackson gravesite in the garden. After that we decided to get going because it was to hot for the baby. Plus we had a long way to go to Texas. My wife and I returned in March 2012. The weather was much nicer and we were able to take our time to walk the property. I am glad that we got the chance to go the second time and take it all in properly.

Andrew Jackson came to national fame when he won the War of 1812 Battle of New Orleans. The battle, oddly enough actually occurred after the war had ended. It took awhile for word to get around back then. He was the last Revolutionary War veteran to serve as President. He was also the first President to come from very humble beginings. He lost what family that he had during the Revolution. At the wars end he was an orphan and in that way related strongly with the new United States, which was in its infancy. He raised in the military all the way to the rank of General. He is often ranked as one of our greatest President. He is also credited as the founder of the modern Democrat party. He died at the Hermitage in 1845.

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